Sega Superstars Tennis Review
Xbox 360 | PS3 | Wii | PS2 | DS
Sega Superstars Tennis box art
System: Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, PS2, DS Review Rating Legend
Dev: Sumo Digital 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: Sega 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: March 18, 2008 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1-2 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Everyone 3.5 - 3.9 = Good
For the Fans
by Branden Barrett

Tennis dates back to the 1800s, where bored aristocrats would smack a small yellow ball over a net to each other again and again for hours on end. Over a century later, it has become one of the world's most popular sports, with millions of people getting in on today's more adrenaline-fueled approach to the game.

Sega Superstars Tennis screenshot

As a fan and player of the sport, any tennis game that nears release gets me excited. Whether it is the realistic physics of Top Spin or the laid back stylizations of Virtua Tennis, there is just something about the sport that makes me want to take on the world. Taking a nod from Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Sega has decided to let its mascots run rampant on the hard courts with the release of Sega Superstars Tennis. Though not as flashy as Brawl, Sega Superstars Tennis is a party game worthy of mention. The question here though is, "does the DS version do the title series justice?" Well, it really just depends on how much you love tennis...or Sega.

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Throughout the years Sega has been preoccupied with continued releases of adventure and role playing games, but that doesn't mean they haven't delved a little into the sport genre. Mentioned earlier, Virtua Tennis is actually a product of Sega's sport division known as Sega Sports. So naturally, that title would be one to build off when making Sega Superstars Tennis, right? Well, what is strange is that Sega's latest actually deviates a little from the mechanics found in their more realistic tennis offerings. Now, that doesn't mean that the game doesn't play like your typical tennis game. Through different button and pad combinations, you can lob, strike, drop, and over-head shots into certain areas of the court. Serves can be placed inside, out wide, or right at your opponent depending on where you aim. Ultimately, though a little sluggish at times, the handheld version plays out like it should, though it would've been nice to see a better use of the touch screen. Aside from the scoring, there is the option to play with the bottom screen, but the feel of it is so unnatural that you will be wishing it never existed; just stick with the control pad.

What is commendable about Sega Superstars Tennis is how well the A.I. performs throughout the game. Most handheld releases see brain-dead A.I. mindlessly just trying to keep up with its superior human adversary. This is not the case here, as beginners will be frantically trying to chase down several of the well mixed shots thrown at you by the computer. The difficulty settings are adjustable and add their own new dimension to the gameplay, whether it is in the form of intensity, shot-making, or how often they use their special moves. Speaking of, an arcade style tennis game wouldn't be complete without some form of fiction, right? Well, considering that all the players are imaginary video game mascots doesn't do much for realism anyway, I suppose.

Sega Superstars Tennis screenshot

Nevertheless, it is these special techniques that help differentiate every player from one another and make each match a little more interesting. However, to use the moves you will need to build up points until your special meter is full. Once it maxes out, you will be able to send a crazy shot back to your unsuspecting rival in the hope of scoring a point or throwing them off balance. The only problem with these little trump cards is that, unlike the console version of the move where the ability can literally take you out of the point, the DS version just loops the ball in crazy patterns. This would be all well and good "if" the path of the ball wasn't already pre-determined before it lands. All too many times I would use my special move on my winded opponent, only for them to stand in the same place and casually return the ball to my side of the court. Say what? The moves are a tad more effective against human opposition, but the computer, especially on the harder setting, will have no difficulty returning your flashy spins and slices.

After you are finished playing singles, Sega Superstars Tennis also allows for doubles matches. That's right; now you and a mentally deficient computer can duke it out with two difficult computerized players. I always wondered why when you are paired with artificial intelligence, it is your partner that is the dumbest of the three computers. It's like they purposely dumb them down in order to make your experience harder. Well, it isn't so much hard as it is frustrating. Whether it is missing an easy ball or moving too far to your side when you already have a clear shot at it, your doubles partner can be a tad burdensome at times. This doesn't mean the whole mode is bad; it's just that they probably could've done a better job with the buddy system.

Sega Superstars Tennis screenshot

Screenshots / Images
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