The Sims: Castaway Stories Review
PS2 | Wii | PC
The Sims: Castaway Stories box art
System: Wii, PS2, PC, PSP, DS Review Rating Legend
Dev: Maxis 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: EA 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: Jan. 29, 2008 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Teen 3.5 - 3.9 = Good
Castaway Stories Literally Covers New Ground

by Cole Smith

One of the most popular computer games of all times, The Sims, sure has withstood the test of time. One may be tempted to say that the franchise has come a long way, but take a moment to reconsider that most of the improvements have not been directed at the core of the gameplay. We've witnessed the development of a more streamlined interface, new and improved 3D graphics, larger environments, and the addition of more diverse elements.

The Sims: Castaway Stories screenshot

Some may say the gameplay has gotten deeper, but that's a direct result of adding more elements to accommodate the increase in computer processing power. The basic premise of micromanaging a virtual person in a virtual world remains a constant despite the changing variables that constitute different games in the series.

As you may or may not know, some of these Sims games can be huge hogs on your system's resources, especially if you want to view the graphics at full resolution. That may be fine for some of the techno geeks that keep up with every micro-trend and seem to have unlimited funds to purchase the latest PC upgrades. But what about the rest of us schleps that have to spend money on things like rent, food, car payments, underarm deodorant, and autographed Conway Twitty posters? Also, what about the people that want to play these games on a laptop that is seriously under-powered? Well until recently, we were relegated to graphics that looked like third-generation VHS copies. Not to mention the slow processing. By the time a hot chick came out of the shower, she would be middle aged.

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The Sims: Castaway Stories addresses most of these issues, but in the process creates a few more. It's a good-looking game that can be played on systems such as laptops that barely meet the bare requirements. Just don't try it on a Pentium One-powered Thinkpad. Not only does the game look good (just don't select the highest resolution), but it sounds great and runs fairly smooth, although I ran into a few mechanical bugs that caused me to have to restart the game a few times. There are some framerate issues, and the load times can really get on your nerves, but overall this is a solid offering. As an added bonus, it does not require any previous version of a Sims game to run. This is a completely stand-alone game. But as I alluded to, these features come at a price. I'll discuss that in detail after an overview of the gameplay.

The Sims: Castaway Stories screenshot

Castaway Stories has you play as a shipwrecked character that find him or herself stranded on a seemingly deserted island. You start with nothing but the basic will to survive. After performing a series of missions in which you acquire food and tools for survival, you discover the island is not so deserted. Interacting with the other people on the island, you begin to build an economic system from the ground up. You will harvest resources, which you will sell, trade, and barter for other necessities. Food can be hunted and/or gathered. Eventually, you can produce commodities from your resources, which will increase their worth. Currency is in the form of resources instead of Simoleons. The missions in the story mode will take you all over the island, allowing you to explore it. You'll find all kinds of interesting things in the different locations, which will definitely pique your interest, but once you've seen everything the island has to offer, the gameplay starts to get old, like a dead fish lying in the sun.

Now, let's get right down to the hard, cold facts. The downside to this game is that it's not as deep as you may have come to expect from a Sims game. It's relatively short, and there isn't a lot of variety. The story mode will take you a couple of days to complete, although it's possible to complete it in a day if you are a dedicated Sims gamer. The Free style mode may seem endless, but since you are on a deserted island, you will eventually realize there is a finite limit to who, what, where, when, and why. How's that for simulated realism? You're stranded on a deserted island, and after a while there isn't a hell of a lot to do. The story does not resolve itself in the story mode. Instead, it propels you into the Free style mode, making sure you are properly prepared and equipped for the challenges that lie ahead. It's too bad the entire game is single-player. This game screams for a massive online multiplayer mode. That would extend the replay value into next year. Alas, although the game is short, it's sweet. It's definitely a good addition to the series, just so long as it's understood the gameplay isn't going to last you a virtual lifetime.

The Sims: Castaway Stories screenshot

Screenshots / Images
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