Army of Two: The 40th Day Review
Xbox 360 | PS3 | PSP
Army of Two: The 40th Day box art
System: X360, PS3, PSP Review Rating Legend
Dev: EA Montreal 1.0 - 1.9 = Avoid 4.0 - 4.4 = Great
Pub: Electronic Arts 2.0 - 2.4 = Poor 4.5 - 4.9 = Must Buy
Release: Jan. 12, 2010 2.5 - 2.9 = Average 5.0 = The Best
Players: 1-2 3.0 - 3.4 = Fair
ESRB Rating: Mature 3.5 - 3.9 = Good
Get Aggro
by Leon Hendrix III

I'm as much a fan of the old action movies as anyone. Movies like Lethal Weapon, and Die Hard, and Dirty Harry are timeless treats. The popcorn flicks today, however, are often a pale imitation by comparison. For some reason, the charm of watching an ordinary cop caught up in the extraordinary hostage situation when international terrorists take over an office building is infinitely preferable to watching that same cop slam a vehicle into a helicopter and dodge a fighter jet by taking a 60 foot leap of faith.

Army of Two: The 40th Day screenshot

The fact is, in those old action gems, the fun was watching a very normal person or group of people do their best to survive and outwit their enemies in extreme circumstances. If you ask me, and of course you would, the outrageous action set pieces of today are better left for the console scene. For action fans or anybody who just likes a good explosion, Army of Two: The 40th Day is going to be a treat.

Army of Two originally told the story of two former career soldiers, Elliot Salem and Tyson Rios. After years of serving their country, the fellas struck out on their own and to find adventure and fortunes around the world. They join a PMC that, of course, ends up screwing them over and they spend the rest of that initial outing figuring out the why. The game, as is often the case with the action genre, was criticized for some basic flaws. That fact that Rios and Salem were often spouting 'Rush Hour' style one-liners in the midst of combat didn't sit well with many critics. Still, the core "two guys against the world" gameplay mechanic was solid and gamers liked the level of customization that allowed them to make weapons their own.

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In Army of Two: The 40th Day, the world's least anxious private military contractors have set out for a nice relaxing vacation in Shanghai (I um… think). And wouldn't you know it, just as they're off the bus, terrorists attack in a big way. As you start the game the initial cutscene plays through the lens of a tourist's camera on a guided bus tour through town just before the destruction kicks off. These opening sequences are a bit confusing, but they're pretty cool nonetheless. There's a scale in 'The 40th Day' that eclipses the first game. Skyscrapers topple, 747's slam into buildings, and explosions clear entire plazas, and that's just for starters. These action scenes really set the mood and bring you right into the game as you scramble to make sense of the destruction. And by 'make sense of' I mean return the favor.

Army of Two: The 40th Day screenshot

'The 40th Day' brings back a lot of the initial features from the original Army of Two and even improves on them. The aggro system, for instance, returns as your best tactical weapon. For those new to the series, 'aggro' is the term Developer EA Montreal uses to describe aggressive actions. Using your partner's movements and attack patterns, you can shift focus from Salem to Rios, or vice versa in order to best engage your enemies. For instance, in one level, as you scramble to escape a crowded building, your partner stands on one ledge as you make your way across another. As enemies engage you, your partner can draw their fire or snipe them to make room for you to advance. It's a strong system, even when you play with the games AI-controlled partner, and it's one of the best and most unique things about the series. Much of this system's success hinges on the games AI. Enemies prioritize players who are currently advancing over players in cover, players who are firing over players who aren't, and so on. Enemies are much less likely to simply run out of cover to attack you and often will make moves that are downright smart (pressing the advantage when they have you pinned, using mobile shields to flank you, etc.).

The level layouts are very well done. There are plenty of points to snipe, cover, and flank your enemies. To EA Montreal's credit, The 40th Day's level design is topnotch and only feels more potent because of the strong visuals. For as detailed as some of the character models are, and as many effects, particles, etc. that accompany your many future firefights, I didn't notice much pop in and the frame rate remains pretty constant. At points throughout the game, the load times seem longer than average for a game on this generation's consoles, and it doesn't help that you can't skip cutscenes; they will replay over and over when you die. I found myself trying to avoid enemy fire just so I didn't have to sit through the same briefing again. It sounds kind of funny, but that really shouldn't be a reason not to go out and pull your partner to safety.

Army of Two: The 40th Day screenshot

Screenshots / Images
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